BRASÍLIA 50 ANOS | URBAN PLANNING :: VIDEO ::: DRIVING AROUND BRASÍLIA IN 1967 LISTENING TO KRAFTWERK

BRASÍLIA :: «DIE NEUE HAUPTSTADT VON BRASILIEN»

Brasília— that very exotic experiment in tropical modernism — played a huge role in my aesthetic development. I loved looking at (and finding!) photos of Oscar Niemeyer’s buildings when I was developing my passion for architecture.

So, I  was particularly thrilled to find this  cool video, «DIE NEUE HAUPTSTADT VON BRASILIEN» that gives «faren faren faren» drive, drive, driving on the autobahn a Brazilian twist.

These four minutes and seventeen seconds give us a fascinating glance at the way Brasília looked a few years after the city’s initial wave of infrastructure was built. (The city was founded on 21 April 1960.)

It may be one of the best historical documents we have about the way things looked back then.

I also really like the cool Kraftwerk tune, «Expo 2000» (any song with “expo” in it is sure to be right up my alley). It’s a good mashup with the images.

I wanted to freeze the following images of my City of the Future for future reference. I think they’re great; enjoy them and the video!

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BUT WAIT: THERE’S MORE …

Brasília em 1967: Plano Piloto e Cidades-Satélites (aka “the back side of Brasília”):

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(thanks to Eyes on Brazil for finding this companion video and for the translation of the sidebar:)

By car, it’s possible to drive all the way through the city, from the Southern entrance to the end of the North Wing without even seeing a stoplight whatsoever.

Every step of the way is completely lined with trees, from where one sees the line of the horizon: the city is plain and the buildings have, at most, six floors. Aside from this, the air in Brasilia is pure because there aren’t any heavy industries around.

But this style of life is enjoyed by those who live in the centralized area called the Plano Piloto, which has too high of a cost for most of the population who live on the outskirts.

While the city possesses close to one car for every two people (the highest index in the country), its collective transport business is four times smaller in size than other cities of the same population. This small index, which makes buying a ticket to ride the bus in Brasilia one of the most expensive throughout the country, owes itself to the large distances between the satellite cities, where 90% of the population live, and the Plano Piloto. The latter concentrates 77% of all jobs in the Capital, according to a survey done by the Ministry of Labor in 1999.

URBAN PLANNING: BRASÍLIA :: quickFACTS

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THE BRASÍL GALLERIES

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